project

Instructions
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Following up on the question you started with in Project #1, for Project #2 you will examine how this topic/issue is presented in popular culture. (see project 1 in attachments)

Step 1: State the question or issue that you are examining this quarter. (It is fine if this is refined as you progress through the quarter, but don’t change topics entirely.)

Step 2: Using a regular search engine (Google, etc), find 3 different articles or posts from popular/mainstream sources that address your issue. Read all three of these.

These must be from popular press sources, such as magazines, newspapers, blogs, etc. – NOT scholarly journals for this assignment.
These articles should have been published within the last five years.

Step 3: List the citations for all three articles.

Authors (year of publication) Name of the article, Source name, URL (if applicable).] See APA citations for help

Choose ONE of the articles (it does not have to be good, scientific, or particularly intelligent!), and answer the following, in your own words, in complete sentences, in list format (according to the numbers here):

1.Who wrote the article? Does the article give any information about the author’s credentials? What additional information can you find about the author on the internet? Given all of this information, what can you, the reader, conclude about the author’s point of view and possible motivation for writing this article?

2. Who published the article (what website/magazine/newspaper)? Is this a credible source or not? How can you tell? Using the internet, can you find out who owns this source? If so, what can you find out about this person or group? What is their agenda? Why might this source have published this specific article?

3. Who is the intended audience for this article? What assumptions are made by the author and the source about this audience?

4. What conclusions about your topic are presented in the article?

5. Does the article present thorough details about the evidence supporting its conclusions/claims, or does it omit relevant information? What information is given to support the conclusions? Is a scientific study described? Can you tell how it was conducted, who the subjects were, and what results the study found? If the article quotes an “expert,” does it give that person’s qualifications (and should we trust them)? What else could you ask about the study discussed or information provided?

6.Does the article speak in definitive terms such as “prove”? If so, why do you think it does this? Does the article acknowledge that more/different research may contribute a different interpretation or explanation? Based on what you know from BPW Project #1, does the scientific evidence support or contradict (or both) the conclusions of this article? Explain your answer.

7. Does the article utilize emotional reasoning? That is, does it create a strong emotional response in the reader? If so, how does it do this (hint: examine the language used!) and why? How do the author and source’s agendas influence this? How do the reader’s (your) own biases influence this?

Step 4: Reflecting on all three articles you read, and your in-depth critical analysis of one of them, write one paragraph, in your own words, summarizing what you found on how this topic is presented in popular culture. Does this correspond to what you know from your review of scholarly literature? If not, what messages are different? Why do you think this information is presented this way in popular sources? What impact does this presentation have on the general public’s understanding of this topic? And *most importantly* why is this important?

How did the political factors affect the drug markets and the drug users’ communities?

 

 

Boivin, R. (2013). Drug trafficking networks in the world-economy. Lecture Notes in Social Networks, 49-61. doi:10.4324/9781315885018

According to Boivin (2013), illicit drug trafficking and use has been at the center of global drug marketing for decades. Bovin argues that drug trafficking is greatly dependent on global political connections. The author looked into the drug marketing connections globally and the political factors that enable the connections for illicit drug transfer. By doing so, he identified a drug market as equal to other market practices. Through the study, the author identifies the role of international organizations in the drug control seizure and drug trafficking surveillance. The author concluded that the existence of a social system, rather known as the world system which stretches over national borders and incorporating members from states or countries which form a global trade network (Boivin, 2013). The network, although illegal, is supported by political factors and other political representatives.

Perceptions of drug abuse, views of drug policies. (2019, December 31). Retrieved from https://www.pewresearch.org/politics/2014/04/02/section-1-perceptions-of-drug-abuse-views-of-drug-policies/

Based on the article ‘perceptions of drug abuse, views on drug policies,’ the Federal government’s annual survey on drug use has portrayed an increase in the rate of drug abuse. The author of the article focuses more on identifying the rate of drug use in the United States and how that has changed in the past few years. Through the research, the author looks into the Federal government database for illicit drug use and cases on drug control. Based on the result of the study, the perceptions of political groups differ on the topic of the problem drug abuse. More than fifty percent of the population believes that drug abuse is a national crisis while the rest take it as a real problem. The author believes that the contradictions that exist between political parties as well as the general population make it hard for the decisions on drug control to be made clear.

Polcin, D. L. (2014). Addiction science advocacy: Mobilizing political support to influence public policy. International Journal of Drug Policy25(2), 329-331. doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2013.11.002

The author of the article focuses on the question regarding the public policies put in place to advocate for the treatment, prevention and recovery from drug addiction. The author uses ‘addiction science advocacy’ into public policy to reduce the harm done by drug addiction. This article argues that addiction practitioners, educators and researchers have professional identities that are rather too narrow to deal with forces that are stronger based on addiction approaches (Polcin, 2014). The author concludes that harm reduction policy, as the main political policy against drug addiction is used to control drug addiction. Based on the findings of the article, social advocacy and the term ‘soft on drugs’ is used to define political leaders who do not agree with tough measures placed on drug users. The author therefore believes that politics has a lot of influence on the drug market and drug users community.

 

 

 

I learned that drug use and drug abuse has been a problem that has existed for years regardless of the federal government’s attempt to solve it. Based on the articles, the contradictions that exist between political parties cause the conflicts and the factors that affect the issue of illicit drug use. From my understanding, it is unclear how political parties disagree regarding what should be done to stop the problem once and for all. Additionally, while conflicts exist, the factors that support the use and marketing of drugs should be eliminated at the first attempt of ending the problem of drug abuse. This brings up the question on why other political factors support drug marketing and the drug users community when the federal government focuses on drug control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Boivin, R. (2013). Drug trafficking networks in the world-economy. Lecture Notes in Social Networks, 49-61. doi:10.4324/9781315885018

Perceptions of drug abuse, views of drug policies. (2019, December 31). Retrieved from https://www.pewresearch.org/politics/2014/04/02/section-1-perceptions-of-drug-abuse-views-of-drug-policies/

Polcin, D. L. (2014). Addiction science advocacy: Mobilizing political support to influence public policy. International Journal of Drug Policy25(2), 329-331. doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2013.11.002

 

 

 

 

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